Archive for ‘Overnaturlig’

16/06/2012

Kim Jong Il, den gudommelige

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28/04/2012

Beviser på overnaturlige fenomener

Fra en artikkel jeg kom over:
Randi $1,000,000 paranormal challenge

James Randi, a.k.a. The Amazing Randi, magician andJames Randi author of numerous works skeptical of paranormal, supernatural, and pseudoscientific claims has for about ten years offered “a one-million-dollar prize to anyone who can show, under proper observing conditions, evidence of any paranormal, supernatural, or occult power.”
[…]
In January 2008, the JREF announced that the offer of the million dollar prize will cease on March 6, 2010.
There are others offering prizes to anyone who can demonstrate psychic powers.
[…]
(liste over folk som tilbyr penger til dem som kan bevise diverse overnaturlige fenomener)
[…]
The first to announce she was ready to be tested was Elizabeth Allen Tomson, but after she was caught with twenty yards of gauze taped to her groin, flowers under her breasts, and a snake in her arm pit, she was never formally tested (Christopher 1975: 188).

The honor of being the first medium tested by the Scientific American team went to George Valiantine. He didn’t know that the chair he sat in during his séance in a completely darkened room had been wired to light up a signal in an adjoining room every time he left his seat. Oddly, phenomena such as a voice speaking from a trumpet that floated about the room happened only at the exact moments the signal lit up.

The Reverend Josie K. Stewart also failed to produce handwritten messages from the dead brought to her by her spirit guide Effie. The committee members marked their cards and she failed three times before declaring success at the fourth trial. But, since the messages she produced were not on the cards that had been supplied by the Scientific American committee, it was determined that she had tried to trick them! What a shock.

Another contestant, Nino Pecoraro, claimed to have Eusapia Palladino as his spirit guide. He was doing well fooling some of the committee members until Houdini showed up during a séance. Houdini took the sixty-foot long rope being used to tie up Pecoraro and cut it into many short pieces and tied up “the psychic’s wrists, arms, legs, ankles, and torso.” Houdini, the master escapologist, knew that “even a rank amateur could gain slack enough to release his hands and feet” when tied with a long rope (Christopher 1975: 191). The great Pecoraro couldn’t perform that night.

The fifth applicant for the Scientific American prize was Mina Crandon, known in the occult world as “Margery.” She didn’t collect the prize, either. (For more on “Margery,” see the entry on ectoplasm.)

In the 1930s, Hugo Gernsback offered a $6,000 prize for any astrologer who could accurately forecast three major events in one year. He never had to pay anyone a cent.

One would think that after more than 150 years of scientific testing of psychics, there would be at least one who could demonstrate a single psychic ability under test conditions.
Parapsychologist Dean Radin claims the evidence for psychic phenomena is so strong that only bias and prejudice keep skeptics from accepting the reality of ESP or PK. Why doesn’t he claim the million dollar prize, then? According to Radin:
“for the types of psi effects observed in the laboratory, even a million dollar prize wouldn’t cover the costs of conducting the required experiment. Assuming we’d need to show odds against chance of say 100 million to 1 to win a million dollar prize, when you calculate how many repeated trials, selected participants, multiple experimenters, and skeptical observers are necessary to achieve this outcome, the combined costs turn out to be more than the prize. So, from a purely pragmatic perspective, the various prizes offered so far aren’t sufficiently enticing. (Radin 2006: 291)”

Medfølgende video:

Full artikkel: http://www.skepdic.com/randi.html